When the going gets tough, the tough start researching…

Hi everyone! Today I wanted to share with you this post from my friend Clare over at Jelly-Like Joints. Clare is a science-lover and "bookish crafter" --a book lover who also enjoys arts and crafts.   She was born with a genetic condition that affects her connective tissues.   This causes her to have hypermobile joints, along … Continue reading When the going gets tough, the tough start researching…

Too much of a good thing: when people don’t really *get* pain science

I wanted to share a really important post with you all this morning, from the author of Chronically Undiagnosed. She's a therapist who is dealing with chronic illness.  Recently, she wrote about her experience attending a chronic pain support group that incorporated some of the theories of modern pain science... but did so very badly. … Continue reading Too much of a good thing: when people don’t really *get* pain science

The Four Categories of Pain– Dr. Jay Joshi

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJsuZFteWHI Hi everyone! I've just discovered this awesome talk on central sensitization by pain management physician Dr. Jay Joshi.  It's totally packed with information I want to share with you all-- such as why it's so hard to get help for central sensitization, and how ketamine infusion treatments can help.  There's so much here, though, that I thought … Continue reading The Four Categories of Pain– Dr. Jay Joshi

Violins and enhanced sensory maps

Sunlight in Winter

violin player

I recently learned about a fascinating study that I had to share with you all.  Researchers took two groups of people– professional violinists and regular, everyday people off the street– and pricked everyone’s index finger with a pin.  The violinists reported feeling much more pain than the non-violinists, even though everyone’s finger was pricked in the exact same way.

I thought this was so interesting.  This article on Optimum Sports Performance sums it up quite well (scroll down to the “Influence Psychology” section.  The author writes, “The enhanced sensory map and awareness of their hands that a professional violinist has makes them hypervigilant to anything that may be remotely threatening.”

I love this phrase “enhanced sensory map.”  They say practice makes perfect– well, all those hours and hours of practicing has given that violinist a very well-developed communication pathway between hand, spinal cord, and brain.  He or she is…

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